Winter Squash

Winter Squash have thick skin, a hollow inner cavity containing hard seeds, and very dense flesh requiring a longer cooking time than summer squash. The skin on winter squash is not edible and the squash must be cooked before eaten. They are picked when fully ripe, unlike summer squash that are picked before fully ripe. Winter squash are drier and have a sweeter taste than summer squash. They are low in sodium, a good source of vitamin A, and high in fiber. Winter squash includes butternut, buttercup, turban, acorn, spaghetti and pie pumpkin.

Storing and Cooking

Most varieties of winter squash can be stored for several months if kept in a cool, dry, dark location. If exposed to temperatures below 50°F, they will suffer damage, and if it exposed to excessive heat, the squash will begin to convert their starches to quickly. It is best to store the squash with part of the stem still attached to help hold the moisture in and they should not be wrapped when stored, unless they have been cut open. Then they should be wrapped in plastic and stored in the refrigerator for 4 to 5 days. A cooked squash can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for 4 to 5 days or it can be placed in the freezer for longer storage.

Winter squash are often cooked and eaten on their own simply with salt and butter added. They also go well with other seasonings, such as cinnamon, ginger, cloves, and allspice. Some winter squash are sweetened by adding brown sugar, maple syrup, and honey. Winter squash can be added to soups, stews, curries, casseroles, and other dishes. They can be mixed with other vegetables and be used to replace sweet potatoes in most recipes. Winter squash are also used in pies, muffins, cakes, puddings, and other desserts.

Did you know?

The Center for Disease Control estimates that every year 76 million Americans get sick, more than 300,000 are hospitalized, and 5,000 die from food borne illnesses

Quotes

"We stand, in most places on earth, only six inches from desolation, for that is the thickness of the topsoil layer upon which the entire life of the planet depends."
~R. Neil Sampson

CSA 2010 is closed

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      • Here's a sample box from October!
      • Celery
      • Celeriac
      • Onions
      • Carrots
      • Beets
      • Cabbage
      • Winter Squash
      • Black Beans
    CSA 2011 is not yet open

    Where We Are

    Spring is Coming!
    Thursdays are open for visitation. We are packing seed orders and chatting it up with friends and family. In addition to eggs and seeds, there are also dry beans and some root stocks floating around and available. The home farm is located at 10145 Oxford Rd. We hope to see you soon!

    303-485-7818

    info@eatabbo.org

      Boulder Farmers Market re-opens Saturdays on April 2 from 8-2 and Wednesdays on May 4 from 4-8

      This year we will also have seeds at the Longmont Farmer's Market for the first 6 markets.

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